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Study Identifies Problem Areas Along Cycling Routes in North America

North American cyclists are eight to 30 times more likely to be seriously injured riding their bikes than their counterparts in northern Europe.

A Ryerson University study, led by Ann Harris with the School of Occupational and Public Health, is considered the first of its kind to “take a comprehensive look at how route infrastructure, particularly at intersections and major roadways, might influence the risk of cyclist injury in Canada.” The major findings of the study, which apply equally to the United States, are:

•At intersections in residential areas, where vehicle speeds are 30 km or less, the risk of cyclist injury is half that at traffic circles on major arterials --19 of the 690 accidents in Vancouver involving cars and cyclist happened at traffic circles.

• Accidents along non-intersections of major arterials are less frequent where separate bike lanes exist, as well as bike routes ‘with traffic diversion on local streets’ and on bike-only paths separated from traffic.

• The risk of injury increases along shared bikes lanes or single bike lanes where parked cars are present. As this video shows, there’s are reasons why North American cyclists are eight to 30 times more like to be seriously injured while riding their bikes than their counterparts in Germany, Denmark and Holland.

Posted By: Bill Moore [14-Mar-2013]

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